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Posts from the PPT/ cool decks Category

Zombie Research from Tim Stock

how outdated research frameworks are deadening opportunities for insights in a new network world. By Tim Stock

Recent events have highlighted, underlined and bolded the fact that the United States is performing blanket surveillance on any foreigner whose data passes through an American entity — whether they are suspected of wrongdoing or not. This means that, essentially, every international user of the internet is being watched, says Mikko Hypponen. An important rant, wrapped with a plea: to find alternative solutions to using American companies for the world’s information needs.

As computer access expands, Mikko Hypponen asks: What’s the next killer virus, and will the world be able to cope with it? And also: How can we protect digital privacy in the age of government surveillance?

EMPATHY: The Key to Brand Success in 2014 (mobileYouth) from Graham Brown (mobileYouth)

Graham Brown of mobileYouth shares latest insights into the power of EMPATHY for branding

Web Trends to Watch in 2014 from David King

Want to know what trends web designers are thinking about for 2014? Here you go! By David King,

We all have that idea that we cant shake out of our head, the one that we think about in the shower or daydream about. Entrepreneur Job Gebbia, shares how his team grew their idea, Airbnb, into a national startup the hard way: by staying lean, “doing things that don’t scale” like meeting users one at a time, and by taking one small step at a time.

One year ago, Abha Dawesar was living in blacked-out Manhattan post-Sandy, scrounging for power to connect. As a novelist, she was struck by this metaphor: Have our lives now become fixated on the drive to digitally connect, while we miss out on what’s real?


As creatives we strive for some form of success — some mountain top, goal, or recognition. So what happens when we finally reach the thing we’ve been aiming for? After a lifetime of experimentation, artist Joshua Davis found his growth slowing after receiving high-level acknowledgment for his work. “I got lazy, I got comfortable, and I produced less,” he says. Stagnant and absent of the fear that fuels his creativity, he embarked on a multi-year journey to make himself uncomfortable, switching tools, methods, and collaborators. Along the way, he discovered the pitfalls of the known and the importance of play and fear in the creative process.