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Posts from the PPT/ cool decks Category

Why do we turn to nonprofits, NGOs and governments to solve society’s biggest problems? Michael Porter admits he’s biased, as a business school professor, but he wants you to hear his case for letting business try to solve massive problems like climate change and access to water. Why? Because when business solves a problem, it makes a profit — which lets that solution grow.

99 Facts on the Future of Business from SAP

Business Innovation is the key ingredient for growth in the future of business. Changes in technology, new customer expectations, a re-defined contract between employees and employers, strained resources, and business and social networks are requiring businesses to become insight-driven businesses. By SAP

Since founding the crowd-sourced errand service TaskRabbit in 2008, Leah Busque has steadily and purposefully built her company from humble Boston beginnings to a national powerhouse. In this talk at the annual 99U Conference followed by a Q&A with Behance’s Scott Belsky, Leah shares five lessons learned from building TaskRabbit from the ground up, including the importance of sharing your ideas liberally, methods used for building a network of supporters and investors, and the importance of setting a B.H.A.G. (Big, Hairy, Audacious Goal).

A series of video interviews directed by Mario De Armas and produced by Sandbox Studios. These videos are a look into the minds of creative professionals who are on the edge of their field. Be it Fashion, Advertising, Design, etc, More to see over at thecreativeinfluence.net

Online copywriting manifesto 2013 international from Dimitri Lambermont

We will speak in a human voice!! Interesting thoughts by Dimitri Lambermont

How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio. via swiss miss

Trust is on the decline, and we need to rebuild it. That’s a commonly heard suggestion for making a better world … but, says philosopher Onora O’Neill, we don’t really understand what we’re suggesting. She flips the question, showing us that our three most common ideas about trust are actually misdirected.